The Most Precious Asset We Have

The Most Precious Asset We Have

The most abused idea in the English language is the concept of time.

Through vernacular, we constantly remind ourselves of the most depressing truth: “We don’t have enough.”
It’s our excuse for everything, from pushing off that 30 minute morning walk to not creating more memories with those whom we cherish. We brush off the idea that writing a novel or hiking through Maccu Piccu is something we actually can do; it’s either something for millionaires or for people who don’t have __insert excuse here__ .

It’s our excuse for everything, from pushing off that 30 minute morning walk to not creating more memories with those whom we cherish. We brush off the idea that writing a novel or hiking through Maccu Piccu is something we actually can do; it’s either something for millionaires or for people who don’t have __insert excuse here__ .
(No, but really, I actually have __my excuse here___).

Questioning one’s life situation with respect to how they use their time is a delicate matter to say the least, perhaps because of our endlessly ticking internal clocks, which is deeply aware that he cannot change its battery.

But perhaps nowhere in the world can one deny the truth that we have enough time to do everything we want, and still enough left to be bored, than the Leonardo Divinci Exhibit in Milano.

In his “short” life of 60 years, he managed to invent some of the world’s most renown things: from the submarine to the idea of the helicopter (although not intentional), from the first flying machine to bridges that redesigned cities. His inventions are still studied today for their ingenuity and precision.

He was also, simultaneously an architect and designed numerous plans to reshape the world’s great cities to make them more efficient, clean, user friendly and functional through the use of his bridges, canals which redirected water and automated cleaning system through using slopes to accentuate rain water.

He worked for the King, wrote and kept up with cultural and political affairs. Oh, I almost forgot, he painted two of the most famous paintings in history: The Mona Lisa and The Last Supper.

Walking through the Museum, one is overwhelmed at the sheer dedication that’s put into his work, the meticulousness that he gave to each project. If I just did one of them in a lifetime, it’s reason to be proud. And these artifacts are just the proof of his time spent on the planet.

And these artifacts are just the proof of his time spent on the planet.

I couldn’t help but reflect on my own life, on the things I’ve put off for someday – like spending more time writing. We don’t have to have Divinci’s commitment to notice improvement, or feel fulfilled. Thirty minutes in the morning is enough to change the energy of my entire day.

I still waste a lot of time by my own definition – which means doing things that don’t matter to me. I found it prudent that I made a commitment to myself this year that I would “do things that matter”, because in the end, and no matter what we do, the end will come too soon, it seems that that’s the only thing that matters.

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