Squished on United Airlines Business Class

Squished on United Airlines Business Class

We booked a desperately last minute flight from Los Angeles to Milan, with stops in London and Munich.
It was the best we could do with 24 hour notice, and we were thankful just to be flying business.
Leaving at 5:00 pm was ideal; just enough time to eat and watch a movie before sleeping on their 180 degree, ‘lie flat’ beds.
I’ll admit I’ve been spoiled when it comes to flying.
Living in Macau made Cathay Pacific my airline of choice, and with nonstop flights to from Hong Kong to LA and Milan, I was spoiled with the best service, comfort and luxury in the sky.
Perhaps my expectations were unrealistically high, but seeing a 2 – 4 – 2 seat configuration was upsetting; on Cathay I never have to think about choosing the best seats – all of them are equally private and exceptional.
I felt ashamed that I was upset, but couldn’t help myself. I’m paying how much to not have an individual chair?
Finding something to complain about is regrettably easy, and is merely our futile attempt to maintain control of a reality in which we haven’t accepted, yet cannot change.
I’m not proud that at times, I’m guilty of being good at it.
When the food arrived, neither my wife nor I got our first choice, which gave me another excuse to maintain that control. I enjoyed it nonetheless, and it represented feeling toward the flight; good, not great.
I chose ‘Into the Woods’ for my viewing pleasure, a musical I had performed in 10 years earlier. Sondheim’s didactic play has many messages, but perhaps none rang truer than two simple words: “I wish,” a prayer every character makes for a future they think will be better than their present situation.
On the flight I wished for a lot of things: more privacy, a bigger seat, different food, more space. And even though the biggest decision and only real struggle I had during the whole flight was “Cabernet from Spain or Malbec from Argentina?”, I felt an unsettling discontentment nonetheless.
Watching the characters made me question on my own perspective. It was as if they were reiterating a simple cycle, whose truth needs constant reminding:
Want it.
Wish it.
Get it.
And we think the cycle ends there…
… until we start wanting again.
Which begs the questions, isn’t contentment only that moment between getting and wanting more?

You May Also Like

Leave a Reply

Password Reset
Please enter your e-mail address. You will receive a new password via e-mail.